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FREE End of the Year Ebook

The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative (TBOTEMC) has offered FREE End of the Year lessons since 2015. It is now 2021, and we hope that teachers and parents still find these FREE lessons for grades K-12 useful and helpful so that their students and children can continue to learn during the summer. 

On each page of the Ebook, you will find links to FREE lessons  as well as priced lessons for many subject areas created by members of TBOTEMC. 

Here are only some of the FREE items found in this year’s End of Year eBook.
Past eBooks 

There are 16 freebies altogether in this 25 page eBook. In addition, you can explore links to thousands of free lessons from our past holiday eBooks, Teach Talk eBooks, and social media sites. So wrap up the 2021school year right with Free End of the Year Lessons by The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative (TBOTEMC). All you have to do is download the free book and click on the link of the resource you like.

It Depends on the Angle - How to Distinguish between Complimentary and Supplementary Angles

My Basic Algebra Concepts class always does a brief chapter on geometry...my favorite to teach! We usually spend time working on angles and their definitions. My students always have difficulty distinguishing complimentary from supplementary angles. Since most of my students are visual learners, I had to come up with something that would help them to distinguish between the two.

The definition states that complementary angles are any two angles whose sum is 90°. (The angles do not have to be next to each other to be complementary.) As seen in the diagram on the left, a 30° angle + a 60° angle = 90° so they are complementary angles. Notice that the two angles form a right angle or 1/4 of a circle.

If I write the word complementary and change the first letter "C" into the number nine and I think of the letter "O" as the number zero, I have a memory trick my mathematical brain can remember.


Supplementary Angles are two angles whose sum is 180°. Again, the two angles do not have to be together to be supplementary, just so long as the total is 180 degrees. In the illustration on your right, a 110° angle + a 70° angle = 180°; so, they are supplementary angles. Together, they form a straight angle or 1/2 of a circle.

If I write the word supplementary and alter the "S" so it looks like an 8, I can mentally imagine 180°.


Since there are so many puns for geometric terms. I have to share a bit of geometry humor. (My students endure many geometry jokes!)



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You might be interested in a variety of hands-on ideas on how to introduce angles to your students. Check out Having Fun With Angles.  It explains how to construct different kinds of angles (acute, obtuse, right, straight) using items such as coffee filters, plastic plates, and your fingers. Each item or manipulative is inexpensive, easy to make, and simple for students to use. All of the activities are hands-on and work well for kinesthetic, logical, spatial, and/or visual learners.

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Math Games! An Effective Way to Teach Math

I currently teach remedial math students on the college level. These are the students who fail to pass the math placement test to enroll in College Algebra - that dreaded class that everyone must pass to graduate. The math curriculum at our community college starts with Basic Math, moves to Fractions, Decimals and Percents, and then to Basic Algebra Concepts. Most of my students are smart and want to learn, but they are deeply afraid of math. I refer to them as mathphobics.

We all have this type of student in our classrooms, whether it is middle school, high school, or college. When working with this type of student, it is important to bear in mind how all students learn. I always refer back to the Conceptual Development Model which states that a student must first learn at the concrete stage (use manipulatives) prior to moving to the pictorial stage, and well in advance of the abstract level (the book). This means that lessons must include the use of different manipulatives.

I use games a great deal because it is an easy way to introduce and use manipulatives without making the students feel like “little kids.” I can also control the level of mathematical difficulty by varying the rules; thus, customizing the game to meet the instructional objectives my students are learning. However, as with any classroom activity, teachers should monitor and assess the effectiveness of the games. 

When using games, other issues to think about are:
  1. Excessive competition. The game is to be enjoyable, not a “fight to the death”.
  2. Mastery of the mathematical concepts necessary for successful play. Mastery should be at an above average level unless teacher assistance is readily available when needed. A game should not be played if a concept has just been introduced.
  3. Difficulty of the rules. If necessary, the rules should be modified or altered in order that the students will do well.
  4. Physical requirements (students with special needs). These should be taken into account so that every player has an opportunity to win.
In addition to strengthening content knowledge, math games encourage students to develop such skills as staying on task, cooperating with others, and organization. Games also allow students to review mathematical concepts without the risk of being called “stupid”. Furthermore, students benefit from observing others solve and explain math problems using different strategies.

Games can also….
  1. Pique student interest and participation in math practice and review. 
  2. Provide immediate feedback for the teacher. (i.e. Who is still having difficulty with a concept? Who needs verbal assurance? Why is a student continually getting the wrong answer?)
  3. Encourage and engage even the most reluctant student.
  4. Enhance opportunities to respond correctly.
  5. Reinforce or support a positive attitude or viewpoint of mathematics.
  6. Let students test new problem solving strategies without the fear of failing.
  7. Stimulate logical reasoning.
  8. Require critical thinking skills.
  9. Allow the student to use trial and error strategies. 
Mathematical games give the learner numerous opportunities to reinforce current knowledge and to try out strategies or techniques without the worry of getting the “wrong” answer. Games provide students of any age with a non-threatening environment for seeing incorrect solutions, not as mistakes, but as steps towards finding the correct mathematical solution. 
$3.25

If you want a challenging but fun and engaging math game, try Contact. It is a fun and attention-grabbing way for students to review basic math facts and to use critical thinking without doing another “drill and kill” activity.

Slope for Vertical and Horizontal Lines

I work in the Math Lab at the community college where I also teach. Last week, I had two College Algebra students who were having difficulty with slope.  They knew the equation y = mx + b, but were unsure when it came to horizontal or vertical lines. By the way, they were using their graphing calculators which I made them put away. (The book said no calculators.) I feel that if they construct the lines themselves, it puts a visual image into their brain much better than if the calculator does it for them. Sure enough, one of the sections in their math books gave the picture of the line from which they had to write the equation. They were amazed that I could just look at a graph and know the slope, give the equation, etc. When I taught high school math, my students couldn't use a graphing calculator until the middle of this particular chapter as I wanted them to physically draw the lines.

First, for those who have no idea what I am talking about, slope is rise over run.  Rise is how far a line goes up, and run is how far a line goes along.  At the right, the line goes up 3 and has a run 5; therefore, the slope is 3/5.  Rise/Run (Rise divided by Run) gives us the slope of the line.

When a line is horizontal, it has no rise, only a run. So the numerator would be zero (for no rise) and the denominator would be a number such as 5 for the run.  0 ÷ 5 = 0  This is true for any horizontal line.

A vertical line is different.  It has rise, but no run; therefore there would always be a number in the numerator, but always a zero in the denominator.  Since we cannot divide by zero, the slope is considered undefined. (I do use rise over run stating that a horizontal line might have 0/5 which is equal to 0 and that a vertical line might have 3/0 is undefined because we can't divide by zero. Our college algebra book uses O/K for okay and K/O for knock out which I like, but I still think the students need to know why.)

I wanted these two students to have a picture that would help them remember the difference.  I thought of a table for the horizontal line and asked them what would happen if the legs of the table were uneven.  They agreed that the table would have slope.  Therefore, the table would have a slope of zero if the legs were even.

I then went blank.  In other words, by creative juices stopped working, and I could not think of a picture that would help them visualize undefined. Since Teachers Pay Teachers has a forum,, I asked my fellow math teachers if they had any ideas.  Here is what some of them came up with.

The Enlightened Elephant suggested using a ski slope. She talks about skiing down a "cliff", which would not be possible (although some students try to argue that they could ski down a vertical cliff) and so the slope is "undefined" because it doesn't make sense to ski down a cliff.  Skiing on a horizontal line is possible so it's slope is zero,  She also talks about uphill (positive slope) and downhill (negative slope). 

Math by Lesley Elisabeth tells her students to use "HOY VUX" (rhymes with 'toy bucks')

             Horizontal - Zero (0) slope - y = ?   
             Vertical - Undefined slope - x = ?

All horizontal lines are =7 or = -3 etc., and all vertical lines are =1 or = 6, etc. Students forget this so the acronym HOY VUX helps them to remember. Once they've mastered the slope concept in Algebra I, for the rest of the school year, for Algebra II (especially equations of asymptotes - a line that continually approaches a given curve but does not meet it at any finite distance) and even in calculus classes for tangent lines, HOY VUX is just faster and more practical. 

Animated Algebra created a video lesson on the Slope Intercept  ($5 on TPT).  She has a boy skateboard down a negative slope, literally right on the graph line. Karen then shows the same boy taking an escalator up on a line that has a positive slope. Later in the lesson, she rotates the line clockwise, each movement with a click, to show the corresponding slope number to link the line to the slope.  She includes lots of other visual cues to help students focus on and pay attention to the concepts.