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A Go Figure Debut for an Author Who Is New

Helal's TPT Store
Today’s post features a teacher from Ontario, Canada. Helal has taught third grade for three years, before taking maternity leave. Now she is staying home to spend some time with her toddler.

What Helal likes best about teaching is the impact she can make on her students. She loves seeing the students’ eyes light up when they finally get a new concept as well as building their character and being a positive memory to look back on in the future.

Helal describes her classroom as structured and organized. She finds that students really benefit from clear guidelines and communication; so, she makes sure that her schedules are up-to-date, that co-constructed criteria are displayed clearly and that students can always look at the walls to find examples and models of excellence.

In her spare time, Helal loves to write. In fact, she has written and published two children's books entitled: Nightly News with Safa and Zaid and the Gigantic Cloud. She also loves crafting; hence, the name of her Teachers Pay Teachers Store – Crafting Creatives. Her store currently contains 31 resources, most of which are reading resources, with five of them free. Her products range in subject matter from science, to math, to language, etc. to resource types (e.g. units, labels, etc.). Her overall goal with her resources is to help teachers inspire creativity in the classroom.

Free Resource
Her free item is a Bullying Poster. Its main objective is to help prevent bullying in your classroom and your school. The free file contains two versions/sizes of the same poster. One is 8.5” x 11” and the other is 17” x 22”.

Only $1.99
Her paid item is a fun cross-curricular activity that combines fractions and writing in one confidence boosting activity! First, students list four equal parts of themselves and then label them within a circle (being held by a superhero - they then design the superhero to look just like themselves)! Then, they use the story planner to tell the tale of how a villain tries to steal one of their superhero traits! This package includes a lined portion for the final story, a student re-visionary checklist and a rubric for teachers. Also included are superhero clip art images to help you decorate a bulletin board to show off student work, or create extra resources.

Helal also has a blog entitled My Everyday Classroom. If you visit her blog, you can get a free book study guide for the book she wrote called Zaid and the Gigantic Cloud. Her blog is not only professional, but it contains many interesting and relevant posts that I think you will find worth reading. Why not check it out?

Glyphs Are Really A Form of Graphing

$3.00
Sometimes I think that teachers believe a glyph is just a fun activity, but in reality glyphs are a non-standard way of graphing a variety of information to tell a story. It is a flexible data representation tool that uses symbols to represent different data. Glyphs are an innovative instrument that shows several pieces of data at once and requires a legend/key to understand the glyph. The creation of glyphs requires problem solving, communication, and data organization.

Remember coloring pages where you had to color in each of the numbers or letters using a key to color certain areas? How about coloring books that were filled with color-by-numbers? Believe it or not, those pages were a type of glyph.


For the Thanksgiving season I have created a Turkey Glyph. Not only is it a type of graph, but it is also an excellent activity for reading and following directions. Students finish a turkey using seven specific categories. At the end of the activity is a completed Turkey Glyph which the students are to "read" and answer the questions. Reading the completed glyph and interpreting the information represented is a skill that requires deeper thinking by the student. Students must be able to analyze the information presented in visual form. A glyph such as this one is very appropriate to use in the data management strand of mathematics.  If you are interested, just click under the resource cover page above.


Defeating Negative Self-Talk

One of the biggest problems with the college students I teach is their math anxiety level. Math anxiety is the felling of tension and anxiety that interferes with the manipulation of numbers and the solving of math problems during tests. In other words - mathphobia! This is a learned condition, not something they are born with and is in no way related to how smart a student is. In my Conquering College class, we have been looking at causes for anxiety which include bad experiences, teacher and/peer embarrassment and humiliation, or being shamed by family members. We've been looking at ways to reduce math anxiety such as short term relaxation as well as long term techniques and managing negative self-talk.

For many of my students, a song is the best way of remembering. I found an old nonsense song by Roger Miller entitled, You Can't Roller Skate in a Buffalo Herd. First we read over the words. Next we watched a video on You Tube and then we actually sang the song. I replaced the words "But Ya can be happy if you've a mind to" with "But ya can be positive if you put your mind to it."

You Can’t Roller Skate in a Buffalo Herd

By Roger Miller

Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
  Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
*But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.

 Ya can’t take a shower in a parakeet cage,
 Ya can’t take a shower in a parakeet cage,
 Ya can’t take a shower in a parakeet cage,
 *But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.
All ya gotta do is put your mind to it,
Knuckle down, buckle down,
Do it, do it, do it!

Well, ya can’t go swimmin’ in a baseball pool,
Well, ya can’t go swimmin’ in a baseball pool,
Well, ya can’t go swimmin’ in a baseball pool,
 *But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.
Ya can’t change film with a kid on your back,
Ya can’t change film with a kid on your back,
Ya can’t change film with a kid on your back,
 *But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.


Ya can’t drive around with a tiger in your car,
Ya can’t drive around with a tiger in your car,
Ya can’t drive around with a tiger in your car,
*But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.
All ya gotta do is put your mind to it,
Knuckle down, buckle down,
Do it, do it, do it!

Well, ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
 *But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.
Ya can’t go fishin’ in a watermelon patch,
Ya can’t go fishin’ in a watermelon patch,
Ya can’t go fishin’ in a watermelon patch,
*But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.

 Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
 Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
  Ya can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd,
  *But ya can be positive if ya put your mind to it.

So how did the lesson go? Let's just say that my college students were having so much fun singing the song that the secretary had to come and shut our classroom door. And the response from the students the next day, "I can't get that song out of mind!" Maybe negative self-talk has finally met its match!


"BOO" to Fractions?


Here is a Halloween riddle: Which building does Dracula like to visit in New York City? Give up? It's the Vampire State Building!! (Ha! Ha!) Here is another riddle. Why didn’t the skeleton dance at the party? He had no body to dance with!   

Okay, so what do these riddles have to do with teaching math? I have been attempting to come up with ways for my students to recognize fractional parts in lowest terms. As you know from this blog, I have used Pattern Sticks, the Divisibility Rules, and finding Digital Root. These are all strategies my students like and use, but to be a good mathematician requires practice - something most of my students dread doing. I can find many "drill and kill" activities, but they tend to do just that, drill those who don't need it and kill those who already know how to do it. So to drill and "thrill", I created six fractional word puzzles for specific times of the year.

The one for October is Halloween Fraction Riddles. It contains eight riddles that the students must discover by correctly identifying fractional parts of words. For instance, my first clue might be: the first 2/3's of WILLOW. The word WILLOW contains six letters. It takes two letters to make 1/3; therefore, the first 2/3's would be the word WILL. This causes the students to group the letters (in this case 4/6), and then to reduce the fraction to lowest terms. The letters are a visual aid for those students who are still having difficulty, and I observe many actually drawing lines between the letters to create groups of two.

At first, I thought my students would breeze through the activities, but to my surprise, they proved to be challenging as well as somewhat tricky - just perfect for a Trick or Treat holiday. Maybe this is an activity you would like to try with your intermediate or middle school students. Just click on this link: Halloween Fraction Riddles.