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How Many Classroom Management Rules Does A Teacher Really Need?


Now that most of us are getting geared up for a new school year, it's time to think about what classroom rules need to be established. Maybe the ones you had last year just didn’t work, and you are looking for a change. I could recommend many "Do this or this will happen" or "Please don't do this as it will break my heart" statements, but lists can become very long and mind-numbing. Maybe that is why God only gave Ten Commandments. Fewer rules means less has to be memorized. So, maybe we need to ask ourselves: “How many classroom rules are really needed?” 

I would suggest making a few general rules that are clear and understandable since being too specific often leads to complicated, wordy rules that might cover every possible situation. Most of the time, I post six simple classroom rules (only two words each) in my room which encompass my main areas of concern. I find them to be more than sufficient to govern general behaviors, and because alliteration is used, the rules are easy for all of my students to remember.

1.  Be Prompt – In other words, be on time to school/class/group.

2.  Be Prepared – Bring the items you need to class or to a group. Study for upcoming tests. Have your homework completed and ready to turn in. 

3.  Be Polite – This rule focuses on how we treat each other. Show respect for your teacher(s) and your fellow students in the classroom, in the school, and on the playground.

4.  Be Persistent - The final rule spotlights the need to stay on task and complete an assignment even though it might be difficult. 

5. Be Productive - Always put forth your best effort! Grades are achieved; not received; so, do your best at all times.

6. Be Positive – Bad days happen! If you are having one of those days, I do understand. Please just inform me before class that you are having a bad day, and I will try to leave you alone during class discussion. This is not to be abused.

I firmly believe that class rules must cover general behaviors, be clear as well as understandable. Being too specific often leads to complicated, wordy rules that might cover every possible situation, but are impossible to remember.  (A good example are the IRS tax rules which I still have difficulty comprehending). 
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Here are a few things to consider when communicating your classroom rules.
  • Establish clear expectations for behavior from day one.
  • Use techniques such as interactive modeling to teach positive behavior.
  • Reinforce positive behavior with supportive teacher language.
  • Quickly stop misbehavior.
  • Restore positive behavior so that children retain their dignity and continue learning.
If you are interested in using these six rules in your classroom, check them out on Teachers Pay Teachers. Each two word rule is written as a one page chart, and are ready to download and laminate to hang in your classroom.


Ten Black Dots - Linking Math and Literature

I am an avid reader, and I love books that integrate math and literature. Occasionally, my blog will feature a book that links the two.  I will summarize the book, give its overall mathematical theme, as well as list various activities you can use in your classroom.

Today's featured book is Ten Black Dots by Donald Crews (Greenwillow Books, 1986).  This picture book is for grades PreK-2 and deals with numbers and operations. 

The book asks the question, What can you do with ten black dots?  Then the question is answered throughout the book by using  illustrations of everyday objects beginning with one dot and continuing up to ten. Simple rhymes accompany the pictures such as:

"Two dots can make the eyes of a fox, Or the eyes of keys that open locks."

Materials Needed: 
  • Unifix cubes or Snap Cubes (multi-link cubes) as seen on the right
  • Black circles cut from construction paper or black circle stickers
  • Crayons
  • Pencils
  • Story paper
  • Calculators -simple ones like you purchase for $1.00 at Walmart

Activities:

1)  Read the book a number of times to your class.  Let the students count the dots in each picture. On about the third reading, have the children use the snap cubes to build towers that equal the number of dots in each picture.

2)  Have the children think of different ways to make combinations, such as: How could we arrange four black dots?  (e.g. 1 and 3, 4 and 0, 2 and 2)  Have the children use black dots or snap cubes to make various combinations for each numeral from 2-10.

3)  This is a perfect time to work on rhyming words since the book is written in whimsical verse. Make lists of words so that the students will have a Word Wall of Rhyming Words for activity #4.
  • How many words can we make that rhyme with:  sun?  fox?  face?  grow?  coat?  old?  rake?  rain?  rank?  tree?
  • Except for the first letter, rhyming words do not have to be spelled the same.  Give some examples (fox - locks or see - me)
4)  Have the children make their own Black Dot books  (Black circle stickers work the best although you can use black circles cut from construction paper. I'm not a big fan of glue!)  Each child makes one page at a time.  Don't try to do this all in one day.  Use story paper so that the children can illustrate how they used the dots as well as write a rhyme about what they made.  Collate each book, having each child create a cover.

5)  Have the children figure out how many black dots are needed to make each book. (The answer is 55.)  This is a good time to introduce calculators and how to add numbers using the calculator.

If you can't find Ten Black Dots in your library, it is still available on Amazon.