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A Go Figure Debut for a Texan Who Is New

Her Store - Math Imagination
Today my Go Figure Debut is for a Texas girl, Linda Bernal, who is in her 27th year of helping children’s minds to grow and to learn to love math. (Like me, she cures mathphobics!) She currently teaches seventh grade math although she has also taught 5th, 6th and 8th graders as well. (She must love that middle school aged student!)

Ever since she was a little girl, Linda has wanted to be a teacher. Her house was the “hangout” spot in the neighborhood, and she can still remember playing “school” with all of the kids on the block. Of course, Linda was the teacher! Her dad even bought her one of those play chalkboards that would flip vertically, and she swears it was her most favorite thing ever!

Believe it or not, Linda actually struggled with math in elementary and middle school. Her forte was reading. Not only was she in a book club, but she had shelves full of books at home; so, you would assume she would want to be a reading teacher, right? WRONG! The turning point was when she attended high school. She claims she had the most patient and amazing math teachers who made it so easy to understand the “numbers with the letters” (a.k.a., algebra) and “all the stuff around the shapes” (a.k.a., geometry). These two teachers inspired her to become a math teacher which still boggles her parents’ minds.

In her math classroom you will see students walking around during a loop game, having discussions on how to solve a problem or sometimes even debates. During practice time, students may be writing on their desks with dry erase markers or creating entries in their interactive journals using foldables. Linda thinks students retain more when they are actively involved and when they have to explain math to another person. (I agree!) She firmly believes students get more out of working on a game with a partner than completing a 30 problem worksheet alone. She still does the worksheet thing; she just doesn’t do it on a daily basis with as many problems.

Only $3.00
One of the games in her store is a 12 problem loop game, and best of all, it is free. In the game, students practice in determining the surface area of nets that create three-dimensional figures. Students find the surface area of each figure by using the formulas for finding the area of rectangles and triangles.

Free Item
Linda currently has sixty-nine items in her TPT store, six of which are free. Most are math activities, but she does have some posters that can be used in any classroom. One of her free resources is called the  Simplifying Fractions Spinner Game. This game has students simplifying fractions by spinning two spinners to create their own fraction so that every student will have a different fraction.

Other resources in her store include Loop Games, Matching Cards, Smack Down, and Fact or Fib. Some of the activities are interactive power points that create great discussions between students! She also has a blog called My Math Imagination. You should take time to go there and read her article called "Nail It."  Not only does she have a mathematical sense of humor but what she does with fingernails is amazing.  Check it out for yourself!

Mathematical Patterns

Since all math is based on patterns, this week, I want to target some mathematical problems in which we investigate developing patterns.

In the first example below, you will notice we begin by multiplying one by one; then 11 by 11, and so forth. Each time we multiply, the number of digits in the multiplier and the multiplicand increases. Do you see the pattern that progresses in the answer (product)? Notice how this multiplication pattern forms a triangle? Can you figure out what kind of triangle it is?


Here is another interesting pattern. In this one, instead of multiplying by 1, then 11, then 111, the answer (product) looks like the multiplier in the pattern above. Do you notice anything else significant?

Yes, we are multiplying by 9 each time. Now look at the number being added, and count the number of ones you see in each answer. Surprised? Isn’t it amazing how math is ordered, methodical and precise? Maybe that is one reason I love to teach it!